Mad Fit

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REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

Mad Fit's All Classes

ABS + BOOTY - with booty band and weights (At Home) 22:31
Workout

ABS + BOOTY - with booty band and weights (At Home)

Mad Fit

13.2K Views
·
Feb 03, 2023
All Levels
ABS + BOOTY - with booty band and weights (At Home)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Feb 03, 2023
  • 13.2K Views
  • 1K Likes

Today we're focusing on the core and booty! We're using light dumbbells and a booty band to maximize the resistance during this home workout. 20 minutes, follow along with me!

#homeworkout #fitness #workout

 

???????? DOWNLOAD THE MADFIT APP HERE: https://madfit.app.link/e/store

 

?? DO THIS WARM UP FIRST: shorturl.at/gsTX5

?? APARTMENT FRIENDLY WARM UP: https://youtu.be/CSrBaHX3HxQ

?? DO THIS COOL DOWN AFTER (5 min): shorturl.at/jswT3

 

????????THE MAT I USE (Exercise 6X4): http://gorillamats.com?aff=19 (MADFIT10 for 10% off)

 

? I N S T A G R A M: @madfit.ig

? T W I T T E R: @maddielymburner

? F A C E B O O K: facebook.com/madfit.ig

? C O N T A C T (business inquiries): madfit95@gmail.com

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

FLAT ABS WORKOUT - with music (At Home No Equipment) 6:40
Workout

FLAT ABS WORKOUT - with music (At Home No Equipment)

Mad Fit

95K Views
·
Jan 27, 2023
All Levels
FLAT ABS WORKOUT - with music (At Home No Equipment)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jan 27, 2023
  • 95K Views
  • 3.8K Likes

This 5 MIN ABS workout is sure to put you in a good mood! Follow along with me as we work our TOTAL CORE, on beat, to the music! I've included countdown beeps, titles of exercises, and AUDIO CUES this time... so it's easy to follow along ????

#AbsWorkout #Fitness #FlatAbs

 

? I N S T A G R A M: @madfit.ig

? T W I T T E R: @maddielymburner

? F A C E B O O K: facebook.com/madfit.ig

? C O N T A C T (business inquiries): madfit95@gmail.com

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

Full UPPER BODY Workout (Tone, Sculpt, & Build) - At Home 22:21
Workout

Full UPPER BODY Workout (Tone, Sculpt, & Build) - At Home

Mad Fit

92.3K Views
·
Jan 24, 2023
All Levels
Full UPPER BODY Workout (Tone, Sculpt, & Build) - At Home
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jan 24, 2023
  • 92.3K Views
  • 4.5K Likes

Try this 20 min dumbbell upper body circuit at home! Tone, sculpt, and build the arms, chest, back, and shoulders! #fitness #homeworkout #workout

?? DO THIS WARM UP FIRST: shorturl.at/gsTX5

?? APARTMENT FRIENDLY WARM UP: https://youtu.be/CSrBaHX3HxQ

?? DO THIS COOL DOWN AFTER (5 min): shorturl.at/jswT3

 

????????THE MAT I USE (Exercise 6X4): http://gorillamats.com?aff=19 (MADFIT10 for 10% off)

 

? I N S T A G R A M: @madfit.ig

? T W I T T E R: @maddielymburner

? F A C E B O O K: facebook.com/madfit.ig

? C O N T A C T (business inquiries): madfit95@gmail.com

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

400 REP SQUAT CHALLENGE (Intense Leg & Booty Workout) 22:09
Workout

400 REP SQUAT CHALLENGE (Intense Leg & Booty Workout)

Mad Fit

87.1K Views
·
Jan 17, 2023
All Levels
400 REP SQUAT CHALLENGE (Intense Leg & Booty Workout)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jan 17, 2023
  • 87.1K Views
  • 3.7K Likes

Time for a workout challenge! 400 reps of different variations of squats in 20 minutes! This is a fun and intense challenge you can add to your workout routine. Can you make it to 400 with me?

#homeworkout #workoutchallenge #fitness

 

? I N S T A G R A M: @madfit.ig

? T W I T T E R: @maddielymburner

? F A C E B O O K: facebook.com/madfit.ig

? C O N T A C T (business inquiries): madfit95@gmail.com

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

BOOTY & HAMSTRING WORKOUT (MadFit App STRONG AT HOME Program) 43:33
Workout

BOOTY & HAMSTRING WORKOUT (MadFit App STRONG AT HOME Program)

Mad Fit

150.2K Views
·
Jan 12, 2023
All Levels
BOOTY & HAMSTRING WORKOUT (MadFit App STRONG AT HOME Program)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jan 12, 2023
  • 150.2K Views
  • 4.2K Likes

Enjoy this SPECIAL sneak peak inside the new STRONG AT HOME PROGRAM inside the MadFit App! We're focusing on lifting heavy and targeting/building those glutes and hamstrings today. The STRONG AT HOME PROGRAM is NOW LIVE!!

 

? I N S T A G R A M: @madfit.ig

? T W I T T E R: @maddielymburner

? F A C E B O O K: facebook.com/madfit.ig

? C O N T A C T (business inquiries): madfit95@gmail.com

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

Fat Burning Workout for TOTAL BEGINNERS (Achievable, No Equipment) 17:04
Workout

Fat Burning Workout for TOTAL BEGINNERS (Achievable, No Equipment)

Mad Fit

316.3K Views
·
Jan 09, 2023
All Levels
Fat Burning Workout for TOTAL BEGINNERS (Achievable, No Equipment)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jan 09, 2023
  • 316.3K Views
  • 10.4K Likes

a 15 min fat burning, full body workout you can do at home without any equipment! A workout designed for TOTAL BEGINNERS! Wether you are just getting into fitness, or are getting back in the fitness game... this one is for you.

#HomeWorkout #Fitness #BeginnerWorkout

 

 

? I N S T A G R A M: @madfit.ig

? T W I T T E R: @maddielymburner

? F A C E B O O K: facebook.com/madfit.ig

? C O N T A C T (business inquiries): madfit95@gmail.com

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

7 MIN KILLER ABS - (At Home, No Equipment) 8:32
Workout

7 MIN KILLER ABS - (At Home, No Equipment)

Mad Fit

260.8K Views
·
Jan 04, 2023
All Levels
7 MIN KILLER ABS - (At Home, No Equipment)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jan 04, 2023
  • 260.8K Views
  • 10.3K Likes

Here is a quick, yet INTENSE ab burning workout you can do at home, in only 7 minutes! 7 minutes, 8 exercises, no equipment, no excuses!

#AbsWorkout #HomeWorkout #Abs

 I N S T A G R A M: @madfit.ig

 T W I T T E R: @maddielymburner

 F A C E B O O K: facebook.com/madfit.ig

 C O N T A C T (business inquiries): madfit95@gmail.com

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

TAYLOR SWIFT DANCE PARTY WORKOUT - Full Body Dance Cardio 14:41
Workout

TAYLOR SWIFT DANCE PARTY WORKOUT - Full Body Dance Cardio

Mad Fit

429.1K Views
·
Dec 15, 2022
All Levels
TAYLOR SWIFT DANCE PARTY WORKOUT - Full Body Dance Cardio
Fitness Dance All Levels
  • Dec 15, 2022
  • 429.1K Views
  • 11.9K Likes

Swifties! This is a full body DANCE cardio routine to Taylor Swift hits throughout the years! Songs like: You Belong With Me, Shake It off, Delicate, and Bejeweled. This dance fitness routine will have you smiling and sweating at the same time.

#taylorswift #dancewithme #fitness

 

00:00 - 3:42 You Belong With Me

3:43 - 7:21 Shake It Off

7:22 - 11:10 Delicate

11:11 - 14:20 Bejeweled

 

???????? DOWNLOAD THE MADFIT APP HERE: https://madfit.app.link/e/store

 

?? DO THIS WARM UP FIRST: shorturl.at/gsTX5

?? APARTMENT FRIENDLY WARM UP: https://youtu.be/CSrBaHX3HxQ

?? DO THIS COOL DOWN AFTER (5 min): shorturl.at/jswT3

 

????????THE MAT I USE (Exercise 6X4): http://gorillamats.com?aff=19 (MADFIT10 for 10% off)

 

? I N S T A G R A M: @madfit.ig

? T W I T T E R: @maddielymburner

? F A C E B O O K: facebook.com/madfit.ig

? C O N T A C T (business inquiries): madfit95@gmail.com

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

KPOP DANCE WORKOUT - BTS, BLACKPINK, MAMAMOO 12:38
Workout

KPOP DANCE WORKOUT - BTS, BLACKPINK, MAMAMOO

Mad Fit

472.8K Views
·
Dec 08, 2022
All Levels
KPOP DANCE WORKOUT - BTS, BLACKPINK, MAMAMOO
Fitness Dance All Levels
  • Dec 08, 2022
  • 472.8K Views
  • 17.4K Likes

A full body, DANCE CARDIO workout to popular KPOP songs! Music from BTS , BLACKPINK , and MAMAMOO. A 12 min dance fitness routine designed to make you sweat and put a smile on your face!

#bts #kpop #fitness

 

00:00 - 3:15 Dynamite

3:16 - 6:12 How You Like That

6:13 - 8:57 Butter

8:58 - 12:15 Hip

???????? DOWNLOAD THE MADFIT APP FREE TRIAL HERE: https://madfit.app.link/e/store

 

????????THE MAT I USE (Exercise 6X4): http://gorillamats.com?aff=19 (MADFIT10 for 10% off)

 

? I N S T A G R A M: @madfit.ig

? T W I T T E R: @maddielymburner

? F A C E B O O K: facebook.com/madfit.ig

? C O N T A C T (business inquiries): madfit95@gmail.com

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

ONE DIRECTION DANCE PARTY WORKOUT (part 2) - Full Body/No Equipment 16:20
Workout

ONE DIRECTION DANCE PARTY WORKOUT (part 2) - Full Body/No Equipment

Mad Fit

247K Views
·
Dec 01, 2022
All Levels
ONE DIRECTION DANCE PARTY WORKOUT (part 2) - Full Body/No Equipment
Fitness Dance All Levels
  • Dec 01, 2022
  • 247K Views
  • 6.4K Likes

A full body DANCE cardio routine to more of One Direction classics! This dance fitness routine will have you smiling and sweating at the same time. Niall Horan, Louis Tomlinson, Harry Styles, Liam Payne, Zayn Malik.

#OneDirection #homeworkout #fullbodyworkout

00:00 - 3:01 You're Still the One

3:02 - 6:23 I Would

6:24 - 9:48 Stockholm Syndrome

9:49 - 12:39 Why Don't We Go There

12:40 - 16:00 No Control

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

INTENSE ABS (No Equipment) - Total Killer Core 11:56
Workout

INTENSE ABS (No Equipment) - Total Killer Core

Mad Fit

774K Views
·
Nov 17, 2022
All Levels
INTENSE ABS (No Equipment) - Total Killer Core
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Nov 17, 2022
  • 774K Views
  • 23.7K Likes

Try this KILLER 10 min sixpack abs workout! This is a quick and efficient workout that targets the ENTIRE core. Trust me, you will feel the burn with this one ????

#HomeWorkout #AbsWorkout #Fitness

 

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

FULL BODY WORKOUT - Apartment & Small Space Friendly (No Equipment, No Jumping) 21:50
Workout

FULL BODY WORKOUT - Apartment & Small Space Friendly (No Equipment, No Jumping)

Mad Fit

663.4K Views
·
Nov 07, 2022
All Levels
FULL BODY WORKOUT - Apartment & Small Space Friendly (No Equipment, No Jumping)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Nov 07, 2022
  • 663.4K Views
  • 20.2K Likes

If you live in an apartment or feel limited working out at home, this workout is for you. This 20 min full body workout can be done in a small space, with NO EQUIPMENT, and there is no jumping/no noise involved.

#homeworkout #fitness #workout

 

 

? I N S T A G R A M: @madfit.ig

? T W I T T E R: @maddielymburner

? F A C E B O O K: facebook.com/madfit.ig

? C O N T A C T (business inquiries): madfit95@gmail.com

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

FULL BODY STRETCH - for Stress Relief & Flexibility (Minimal Talking) 18:26
Workout

FULL BODY STRETCH - for Stress Relief & Flexibility (Minimal Talking)

Mad Fit

305.6K Views
·
Nov 03, 2022
All Levels
FULL BODY STRETCH - for Stress Relief & Flexibility (Minimal Talking)
Yoga Workout All Levels
  • Nov 03, 2022
  • 305.6K Views
  • 11.8K Likes

De-stress with this 20 minute calming stretch routine that includes light and easy full body stretches for stress relief and flexibility! Minimal talking for a relaxing experience.

 

#fitness #yoga #workout

 

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

TONED ARMS WORKOUT (No Equipment) 8:45
Workout

TONED ARMS WORKOUT (No Equipment)

Mad Fit

256.8K Views
·
Oct 31, 2022
All Levels
TONED ARMS WORKOUT (No Equipment)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Oct 31, 2022
  • 256.8K Views
  • 9.1K Likes

Follow along to this 7 minute toned arms workout! No equipment needed. Designed to tone and strengthen the arms, shoulders, chest and back!

#HomeWorkout #Fitness #workout

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

Taylor Swift - MIDNIGHTS DANCE PARTY (full body workout) 10:19
Workout

Taylor Swift - MIDNIGHTS DANCE PARTY (full body workout)

Mad Fit

421.7K Views
·
Oct 28, 2022
All Levels
Taylor Swift - MIDNIGHTS DANCE PARTY (full body workout)
Fitness Dance All Levels
  • Oct 28, 2022
  • 421.7K Views
  • 11.7K Likes

A full body DANCE CARDIO workout to Taylor Swift's new album MIDNIGHTS! A great way to get a sweat on, and it's guaranteed to put a smile on your face! Dance Fitness!!

#WithMe #homeworkout #TaylorSwift

 

Lavender Haze 00:00 - 3:20

Anti Hero 3:21 - 6:40

Karma 6:41- 10:00

 

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

THE BEST AT HOME BOOTY WORKOUT (No Equipment) 22:06
Workout

THE BEST AT HOME BOOTY WORKOUT (No Equipment)

Mad Fit

369.7K Views
·
Oct 24, 2022
All Levels
THE BEST AT HOME BOOTY WORKOUT (No Equipment)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Oct 24, 2022
  • 369.7K Views
  • 13K Likes

This 20 min booty burn at home is the perfect NO EQUIPMENT workout! Full of some of my fav booty exercises. You can add weights or booty bands to this workout for an extra burn, but not totally necessary!

#fitness #homeworkout #workout

 

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

Full UPPER BODY Workout (Tone & Sculpt) - At Home 21:23
Workout

Full UPPER BODY Workout (Tone & Sculpt) - At Home

Mad Fit

426.8K Views
·
Sep 22, 2022
All Levels
Full UPPER BODY Workout (Tone & Sculpt) - At Home
Fitness Strength All Levels
  • Sep 22, 2022
  • 426.8K Views
  • 13K Likes

Follow along with this 20 min dumbbell upper body circuit at home! Tone, sculpt, and build the arms, chest, back, and shoulders!

#homeworkout #fitness #workout

 

? I N S T A G R A M: @madfit.ig

? T W I T T E R: @maddielymburner

? F A C E B O O K: facebook.com/madfit.ig

? C O N T A C T (business inquiries): madfit95@gmail.com

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

AB WORKOUT - No Equipment (Sixpack Abs) 16:45
Workout

AB WORKOUT - No Equipment (Sixpack Abs)

Mad Fit

536.5K Views
·
Sep 05, 2022
All Levels
AB WORKOUT - No Equipment (Sixpack Abs)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Sep 05, 2022
  • 536.5K Views
  • 16.6K Likes

Follow along with this 15 min intense abs workout ! No equipment needed and you can do this anywhere. This is a total core workout that focuses on all areas of the core with minimal rests!

#HomeWorkout #AbWorkout #fitness

 

 

? I N S T A G R A M: @madfit.ig

? T W I T T E R: @maddielymburner

? F A C E B O O K: facebook.com/madfit.ig

? C O N T A C T (business inquiries): madfit95@gmail.com

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

FULL BODY HIIT (No Jumping + No Equipment) 32:41
Workout

FULL BODY HIIT (No Jumping + No Equipment)

Mad Fit

497.2K Views
·
Aug 29, 2022
All Levels
FULL BODY HIIT (No Jumping + No Equipment)
Fitness HIIT All Levels
  • Aug 29, 2022
  • 497.2K Views
  • 13.9K Likes

Follow along with this 30 minute FULL BODY WORKOUT! This workout is APARTMENT FRIENDLY as it has NO JUMPING and requires NO EQUIPMENT!

#homeworkout #fitness #workout

 

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

FUN CARDIO DANCE FITNESS CHALLENGE - No Equipment (with music and beeps) 7:08
Workout

FUN CARDIO DANCE FITNESS CHALLENGE - No Equipment (with music and beeps)

Mad Fit

314.5K Views
·
Aug 22, 2022
All Levels
FUN CARDIO DANCE FITNESS CHALLENGE - No Equipment (with music and beeps)
Fitness Cardio All Levels
  • Aug 22, 2022
  • 314.5K Views
  • 9.1K Likes

Try this 7 min dance cardio challenge to some throwback music! This one will get your heart rate up, breathing heavy, all while having fun and moving to the beat of the song!

#dance #fitness #homeworkout

 

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

STANDING ABS Workout (No Equipment) 14:00
Workout

STANDING ABS Workout (No Equipment)

Mad Fit

610.8K Views
·
Aug 18, 2022
All Levels
STANDING ABS Workout (No Equipment)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Aug 18, 2022
  • 610.8K Views
  • 16.3K Likes

No sitting, laying down, or crunches in this Standing Abs Workout. 12 minutes of core work. No equipment needed in this bodyweight ab workout!

#abs #fitness #homeworkout

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

NO SQUAT/LUNGE Leg & Booty Workout (NO EQUIPMENT & Knee Friendly) 21:39
Workout

NO SQUAT/LUNGE Leg & Booty Workout (NO EQUIPMENT & Knee Friendly)

Mad Fit

211.9K Views
·
Aug 15, 2022
All Levels
NO SQUAT/LUNGE Leg & Booty Workout (NO EQUIPMENT & Knee Friendly)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Aug 15, 2022
  • 211.9K Views
  • 9.4K Likes

A 20 minute, knee friendly/low impact, lower body workout to target the legs, thighs, and butt! NO squats or lunges are included in this workout. NO REPEATS & entirely equipment free!

#fitness #homeworkout #workout

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

6 MIN PLANK CHALLENGE - A Core and Arm Workout! 7:58
Workout

6 MIN PLANK CHALLENGE - A Core and Arm Workout!

Mad Fit

241.5K Views
·
Aug 08, 2022
All Levels
6 MIN PLANK CHALLENGE - A Core and Arm Workout!
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Aug 08, 2022
  • 241.5K Views
  • 7.9K Likes

Can you complete the challenge? Follow along with me as we do 12 different variations of plank in this quick and intense challenge. Your core and arms will be on fire by the end! 

#fitness #homeworkout #challenge

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

FULL BODY - A quick & intense total body burn 6:35
Workout

FULL BODY - A quick & intense total body burn

Mad Fit

248.5K Views
·
Aug 04, 2022
All Levels
FULL BODY - A quick & intense total body burn
Fitness Cardio All Levels
  • Aug 04, 2022
  • 248.5K Views
  • 9.2K Likes

Follow along to this 5 minute full body workout with NO EQUIPMENT! This is a full body cardio workout focused on getting the heart rate up, getting sweaty, and breathing heavy.

#homeworkout #fitness #workout

 

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

SLOW WORKOUT FOR PERIOD/PMS (Relieve Tension, Full Body) 14:22
Workout

SLOW WORKOUT FOR PERIOD/PMS (Relieve Tension, Full Body)

Mad Fit

208.2K Views
·
Aug 01, 2022
All Levels
SLOW WORKOUT FOR PERIOD/PMS (Relieve Tension, Full Body)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Aug 01, 2022
  • 208.2K Views
  • 11.3K Likes

This LOW INTENSITY/LOW IMPACT workout is perfect for when it's that time of the month/when you're on your period. We're taking things slow with this workout, no jumping and incorporating stretching to help relieve tension in the lower belly & back. This is a full body workout and there is no equipment needed!

#fitness #homeworkout #yoga

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

WARM UP FOR AT HOME OR GYM WORKOUTS 6:45
Workout

WARM UP FOR AT HOME OR GYM WORKOUTS

Mad Fit

536.5K Views
·
Jul 28, 2022
All Levels
WARM UP FOR AT HOME OR GYM WORKOUTS
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jul 28, 2022
  • 536.5K Views
  • 11.7K Likes

Join me in this 5 min warm up routine for AT HOME OR GYM workouts! Warming up is so important and you should be warming up before EVERY single workout!

#fitness #warmup #homeworkout

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

TONED ARMS WORKOUT (At Home Minimal Equipment) 11:53
Workout

TONED ARMS WORKOUT (At Home Minimal Equipment)

Mad Fit

312.5K Views
·
Jul 25, 2022
All Levels
TONED ARMS WORKOUT (At Home Minimal Equipment)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jul 25, 2022
  • 312.5K Views
  • 11.9K Likes

A 10 minute arms workout to tone that upper body! All you need is a pair of light dumbbells!

#fitness #homeworkout #armworkout

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

RESISTANCE BAND BOOTY WORKOUT 12:02
Workout

RESISTANCE BAND BOOTY WORKOUT

Mad Fit

231K Views
·
Jul 21, 2022
All Levels
RESISTANCE BAND BOOTY WORKOUT
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jul 21, 2022
  • 231K Views
  • 8.7K Likes

This workout will tone, shape, and grow the booty at home or in the gym using just resistance/mini/loop bands! Glute activation is SO important when it comes to proper glute work. You can use this on it's own OR use it as a quick glute activation warm up before your workout.

#homeworkout #fitness #workout

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

STRETCH & TRAIN GOOD MORNING WORKOUT (No Equipment, Beginner Friendly) 17:16
Workout

STRETCH & TRAIN GOOD MORNING WORKOUT (No Equipment, Beginner Friendly)

Mad Fit

644.7K Views
·
Jul 13, 2022
All Levels
STRETCH & TRAIN GOOD MORNING WORKOUT (No Equipment, Beginner Friendly)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jul 13, 2022
  • 644.7K Views
  • 22.9K Likes

Roll out of bed and try this 15 minute GOOD MORNING workout! This is the perfect way to wake your body up and get the body moving for the day. This workout combines stretching and slow strength exercises!

#fitness #workout #yoga

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

LOW IMPACT FULL BODY - No Repeats, No Jumping, No Equipment (Warm Up & Cool Down Included) 30:50
Workout

LOW IMPACT FULL BODY - No Repeats, No Jumping, No Equipment (Warm Up & Cool Down Included)

Mad Fit

564.4K Views
·
Jul 07, 2022
All Levels
LOW IMPACT FULL BODY - No Repeats, No Jumping, No Equipment (Warm Up & Cool Down Included)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jul 07, 2022
  • 564.4K Views
  • 18.4K Likes

This is an apartment friendly, low impact, total body workout! You don't need any equipment for this one... just yourself! Warm up and cool down are included and there are NO REPEATS!

#fitness #homeworkout #workout

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

Post Malone - I Like You (A Happier Song) w. Doja Cat - AB WORKOUT ROUTINE 3:23
Workout

Post Malone - I Like You (A Happier Song) w. Doja Cat - AB WORKOUT ROUTINE

Mad Fit

200K Views
·
Jul 04, 2022
All Levels
Post Malone - I Like You (A Happier Song) w. Doja Cat - AB WORKOUT ROUTINE
Fitness Dance All Levels
  • Jul 04, 2022
  • 200K Views
  • 5.6K Likes

A choreographed ab workout to "I Like You (A Happier Song) w. Doja Cat" by Post Malone! An equipment free, total core, dance inspired workout you can do at home!

#postmalone #dojacat #fitness

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

Charlie Puth - Left And Right (feat. Jung Kook of BTS) FULL BODY WORKOUT ROUTINE! 2:45
Workout

Charlie Puth - Left And Right (feat. Jung Kook of BTS) FULL BODY WORKOUT ROUTINE!

Mad Fit

223.7K Views
·
Jun 30, 2022
All Levels
Charlie Puth - Left And Right (feat. Jung Kook of BTS) FULL BODY WORKOUT ROUTINE!
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jun 30, 2022
  • 223.7K Views
  • 8.7K Likes

Left and Right by Charlie Puth and Jungkook from BTS full body workout! A choreographed, equipment free, total body workout you can do at home!

#bts #jungkook #fitness

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

ABS + YOGA - Slow and Controlled Core Workout (No Equipment) 12:15
Workout

ABS + YOGA - Slow and Controlled Core Workout (No Equipment)

Mad Fit

269.9K Views
·
Jun 28, 2022
All Levels
ABS + YOGA - Slow and Controlled Core Workout (No Equipment)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jun 28, 2022
  • 269.9K Views
  • 12.9K Likes

A slow, controlled, and on the floor total core workout! This workout combines stretching and lengthening movements along with deep core exercises to work on that sixpack!

#AbsWorkout #HomeWorkout #yoga

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

BEGINNER FLEXIBILITY ROUTINE (Stretches for the Inflexible) 22:54
Workout

BEGINNER FLEXIBILITY ROUTINE (Stretches for the Inflexible)

Mad Fit

207.1K Views
·
Jun 23, 2022
Beginner
BEGINNER FLEXIBILITY ROUTINE (Stretches for the Inflexible)
Fitness Workout Beginner
  • Jun 23, 2022
  • 207.1K Views
  • 9.9K Likes

Not flexible? Follow along with this 20 min stretch routine designed to help increase flexibility! Great for beginner's or anyone in need of a great stretch!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

BOOTY BURN (At Home, No Equipment, No Repeats) 16:33
Workout

BOOTY BURN (At Home, No Equipment, No Repeats)

Mad Fit

462.5K Views
·
Jun 20, 2022
All Levels
BOOTY BURN (At Home, No Equipment, No Repeats)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jun 20, 2022
  • 462.5K Views
  • 15.6K Likes

A 15 minute at home butt/bum/glute workout that is intense! No equipment needed for this home workout!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

TONED ARMS WORKOUT - with music & beeps (Dancer Arms No Equipment) 5:33
Workout

TONED ARMS WORKOUT - with music & beeps (Dancer Arms No Equipment)

Mad Fit

397.4K Views
·
Jun 17, 2022
All Levels
TONED ARMS WORKOUT - with music & beeps (Dancer Arms No Equipment)
Fitness Dance All Levels
  • Jun 17, 2022
  • 397.4K Views
  • 11.2K Likes

This 5 MIN DANCER ARMS workout will not only get your arms burning, but will put you in a good mood too!. Follow along with me as we work our arms on beat, to the music! Music from DUA LIPA, ELTON JOHN, & LOST FREQUENCIES. I've included countdown beeps and titles of exercises so it's easy to follow along.

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

TONED ARMS + FLAT ABS 16:25
Workout

TONED ARMS + FLAT ABS

Mad Fit

249.7K Views
·
Jun 13, 2022
All Levels
TONED ARMS + FLAT ABS
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jun 13, 2022
  • 249.7K Views
  • 9.6K Likes

This 2 in 1 workout targets your arms and abs, can be done at home or in the gym, and uses minimal equipment! Today I'm using a set of light weights (5lbs dumbbells), but you can use any household objects if you don't have access to weights!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

KILLER HIIT Full Body Workout (No Equipment, No Repeats) 11:24
Workout

KILLER HIIT Full Body Workout (No Equipment, No Repeats)

Mad Fit

407.8K Views
·
Jun 07, 2022
All Levels
KILLER HIIT Full Body Workout (No Equipment, No Repeats)
Fitness HIIT All Levels
  • Jun 07, 2022
  • 407.8K Views
  • 14K Likes

Try this high intensity, 10 minute, full body workout! No equipment and NO REPEATS. Get ready to sweat!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

DAILY STRETCH to Fix Your Posture! 8:52
Workout

DAILY STRETCH to Fix Your Posture!

Mad Fit

566.7K Views
·
Jun 01, 2022
All Levels
DAILY STRETCH to Fix Your Posture!
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Jun 01, 2022
  • 566.7K Views
  • 22.2K Likes

Today we are working on fixing that rounded back from sitting too much! We are focusing on opening up the chest, shoulders and back to help reduce tension, knots, and pain! This stretch is only 7 minutes, but can make a huge improvement if done daily!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

HARRY'S HOUSE DANCE PARTY WORKOUT - full body/no equipment 15:21
Workout

HARRY'S HOUSE DANCE PARTY WORKOUT - full body/no equipment

Mad Fit

800.7K Views
·
May 27, 2022
All Levels
HARRY'S HOUSE DANCE PARTY WORKOUT - full body/no equipment
Fitness Dance All Levels
  • May 27, 2022
  • 800.7K Views
  • 21K Likes

A full body DANCE CARDIO workout to 5 songs off of Harry Style's new album "Harry's House"

00:00 - 3:00 Music For A Sushi Restaurant

3:01 - 5:55 Late Night Talking

5:56 - 9:01 Daydreaming

9:02 - 11:25 Keep Driving

11:26 - 15:00 Satellite

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

FULL BODY SWEAT SESH (no jumping, no equipment) 11:18
Workout

FULL BODY SWEAT SESH (no jumping, no equipment)

Mad Fit

536.3K Views
·
May 23, 2022
All Levels
FULL BODY SWEAT SESH (no jumping, no equipment)
Fitness HIIT All Levels
  • May 23, 2022
  • 536.3K Views
  • 19.9K Likes

Here's a quick 10 min CARDIO HIIT workout to target your full body! No equipment & NO JUMPING!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

RESISTANCE BAND BOOTY WORKOUT (At Home Glute Workout) 11:49
Workout

RESISTANCE BAND BOOTY WORKOUT (At Home Glute Workout)

Mad Fit

249K Views
·
May 17, 2022
All Levels
RESISTANCE BAND BOOTY WORKOUT (At Home Glute Workout)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • May 17, 2022
  • 249K Views
  • 8.8K Likes

This 10 min workout will tone, shape, and grow the booty at home or in the gym using just resistance/mini/loop bands! Glute activation is SO important when it comes to proper glute work. You can use this as a warm up, as a quick pump, or as a burn out!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

Lizzo - About Damn Time // FULL BODY DANCE CARDIO 3:20
Workout

Lizzo - About Damn Time // FULL BODY DANCE CARDIO

Mad Fit

365.3K Views
·
May 13, 2022
All Levels
Lizzo - About Damn Time // FULL BODY DANCE CARDIO
Fitness Dance All Levels
  • May 13, 2022
  • 365.3K Views
  • 7.5K Likes

A full body DANCE WORKOUT routine to Lizzo's new single "About Damn Time" ????

DO THIS WARM UP FIRST: https://www.dareme.live/class/warm-up-for-at-home-workouts

APARTMENT FRIENDLY WARM UP: https://www.dareme.live/class/warm-up-for-at-home-workouts-no-jumping

DO THIS COOL DOWN AFTER (5 min): https://www.dareme.live/class/full-body-cool-down-stretches-recovery-flexibility

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

TOTAL BEGINNER FULL BODY Workout (No Equipment) 21:36
Workout

TOTAL BEGINNER FULL BODY Workout (No Equipment)

Mad Fit

0.9M Views
·
May 12, 2022
Beginner
TOTAL BEGINNER FULL BODY Workout (No Equipment)
Fitness Workout Beginner
  • May 12, 2022
  • 0.9M Views
  • 26.6K Likes

a 20 min fat burning, full body workout you can do at home without any equipment! A workout designed for TOTAL BEGINNERS! Wether you are just getting into fitness, or are getting back in the fitness game... this one is for you!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

TONE YOUR ARMS WORKOUT (No Equipment) 12:14
Workout

TONE YOUR ARMS WORKOUT (No Equipment)

Mad Fit

424.5K Views
·
May 05, 2022
All Levels
TONE YOUR ARMS WORKOUT (No Equipment)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • May 05, 2022
  • 424.5K Views
  • 13.7K Likes

A 10 minute arms workout to tone that upper body! There is no equipment needed, and you can do this workout anywhere!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

2 in 1- ABS & BOOTY At Home Workout (booty band, no repeats) 16:23
Workout

2 in 1- ABS & BOOTY At Home Workout (booty band, no repeats)

Mad Fit

287.5K Views
·
May 02, 2022
All Levels
2 in 1- ABS & BOOTY At Home Workout (booty band, no repeats)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • May 02, 2022
  • 287.5K Views
  • 10.2K Likes

A 15 minute FLAT BELLY & ROUND BOOTY workout. No repeats! Get ready to feel the burn!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

100 REP SQUAT CHALLENGE (Tone & Lift the Booty & Thighs) 6:16
Workout

100 REP SQUAT CHALLENGE (Tone & Lift the Booty & Thighs)

Mad Fit

248.8K Views
·
Apr 28, 2022
All Levels
100 REP SQUAT CHALLENGE (Tone & Lift the Booty & Thighs)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Apr 28, 2022
  • 248.8K Views
  • 8.7K Likes

Time for a workout challenge! 100 reps of different variations of squats in 5 minutes! This is a great challenge you can add into your daily routine or even at the end of your workouts as a burn out! How many rounds can you do?

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

CALF WORKOUT (Dancer Calves Challenge) - No Equipment 7:24
Workout

CALF WORKOUT (Dancer Calves Challenge) - No Equipment

Mad Fit

437.8K Views
·
Apr 21, 2022
All Levels
CALF WORKOUT (Dancer Calves Challenge) - No Equipment
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Apr 21, 2022
  • 437.8K Views
  • 13K Likes

Follow along with this 5 minute Ballerina/Dancer calf workout challenge! Designed to tone and sculpt your calves... get ready to feel the burn!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

FULL BODY COOL DOWN STRETCHES (Recovery & Flexibility) 7:05
Workout

FULL BODY COOL DOWN STRETCHES (Recovery & Flexibility)

Mad Fit

681.1K Views
·
Apr 11, 2022
All Levels
FULL BODY COOL DOWN STRETCHES (Recovery & Flexibility)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Apr 11, 2022
  • 681.1K Views
  • 18.9K Likes

Here's a quick 5 min full body cool down that you can do after every workout to help with recovery and flexibility!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

NO JUMPING HIIT (Apartment Friendly, Full Body Fat Burn) 11:17
Workout

NO JUMPING HIIT (Apartment Friendly, Full Body Fat Burn)

Mad Fit

889.7K Views
·
Feb 24, 2022
All Levels
NO JUMPING HIIT (Apartment Friendly, Full Body Fat Burn)
Fitness HIIT All Levels
  • Feb 24, 2022
  • 889.7K Views
  • 27.3K Likes

This 10 min NO REPEAT, fat burning HIIT workout is an apartment friendly, full body workout that will get you sweating and breathing heavy without disturbing your neighbours. NO JUMPING & NO NOISE!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

WARM UP FOR AT HOME WORKOUTS (No Jumping) 6:45
Workout

WARM UP FOR AT HOME WORKOUTS (No Jumping)

Mad Fit

0 Views
·
Aug 16, 2021
All Levels
WARM UP FOR AT HOME WORKOUTS (No Jumping)
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Aug 16, 2021
  • 0 Views
  • 0 Likes

Join me in this 5 min APARTMENT FRIENDLY (no jumping) warm up routine for at home workouts! Warming up is so important and you should be warming up before EVERY single workout! 

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

Low Impact FULL BODY HIIT Workout (No Equipment + No Jumping) 22:50
Workout

Low Impact FULL BODY HIIT Workout (No Equipment + No Jumping)

Mad Fit

9M Views
·
Mar 24, 2020
All Levels
Low Impact FULL BODY HIIT Workout (No Equipment + No Jumping)
Fitness HIIT All Levels
  • Mar 24, 2020
  • 9M Views
  • 199.3K Likes

A 20 minute APARTMENT FRIENDLY full body hiit workout AT HOME! Low impact, no jumping, equipment free, and NO REPEAT! 

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.

WARM UP FOR AT HOME WORKOUTS 11:57
Workout

WARM UP FOR AT HOME WORKOUTS

Mad Fit

5M Views
·
Dec 05, 2019
All Levels
WARM UP FOR AT HOME WORKOUTS
Fitness Workout All Levels
  • Dec 05, 2019
  • 5M Views
  • 58.8K Likes

This is a super simple 10 min warm up you can use for at home workouts! Cardio & stretches!

Mad Fit

REAL TIME workouts. fitness. inspiration.

I started dancing when I was three, then danced competitively for 17 years. I did all kinds of dance—tap, jazz, pointe—and competed in Germany and the U.S. I would train between three to seven hours a day, six days a week.

When I was in high school in Waterdown, just east of Hamilton, I got a part-time job at a health food store called Goodness Me. After graduating high school in 2013, I bumped to full-time. I was still dancing, but I had no idea what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. During my time at the store, I became a vegan, and in 2015 I started vlogging about what I was eating on Instagram and YouTube. When I hit to 1,000 subscribers by June 2016, I started earning small amounts of ad revenue.

By September 2016, I saved up enough from my job to go on a months-long trip with my boyfriend at the time, Kyle Fraser. We started in Thailand and then went to Bali, Australia and Hawaii. We made friends with a few Australian travellers in Thailand and stayed at their place in Adelaide for seven months. During our trip, I’d been posting daily food vlogs and recipe videos along with travel content, and my channel started to take off. Kyle helped me film, and he appeared in many of the videos, too. By the end of 2016, I had about 50,000 subscribers.

When we got back to Canada in April 2017, we were making about $1,000 (U.S.) monthly in ad revenue, and we realized that we could pay our rent doing YouTube full-time. I threw myself into the work, and after six months, Kyle left a part-time job to devote himself full time to our channel. Our earnings were based on the number of views, but also based on the watch time. So if somebody watched my video for seven minutes compared to three minutes, they’d see more ads and I’d get more revenue.

By this time, I’d quit dancing, but I missed the strength training, so I started doing bodyweight workouts. I posted them on my channel, and they started getting a lot of views. Our most popular one at the time was a 10-minute couples workout video, which now has a million views. I was reaching a whole new audience, and Kyle suggested I start a separate fitness channel, since my first channel had been focused on vegan recipes and what I eat.

In March 2018, I started MadFit. The goal was to post quick, effective workouts for people who didn’t have have a lot of motivation or a lot of time. The growth was slow to start, so I stayed focused on the food channel because that was generating income. I was posting there three times a week on the food channel, and once or twice on MadFit. A few months later, things picked up. What’s great about the workout videos is that they’re evergreen. It’s not like a vlog where somebody watches it once and they’re never going to watch it again; viewers are going to come back and watch the same videos over and over. By August 2018, I was generating a few dollars a day from MadFit. Then, within a few months, a few of my videos were blowing up, like a lower abs video that now has 8.4 million views.

One day in May 2019, I had an epiphany while working out in my living room: I decided to create workouts to specific songs. Ten minutes later, the routine was done. I turned on my lights, turned on the camera and filmed my first song workout to “I Don’t Care” by Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber.

I don’t get paid for those videos—YouTube automatically detects the copyrighted music when I upload and flags it, then the artist or music label is notified and they get the ad revenue. But these videos give me a lot more exposure and more eyes on my channel. I also love making the videos. My workout to “Bad Guy” by Billie Eilish, which I uploaded in June 2019, is now my most popular video at almost 11 million views. Around this time, I started getting more subscribers on MadFit than I was on my food channel, so I switched my focus to fitness.

When the pandemic hit, I had about 1.3 million subscribers on MadFit. Suddenly, gyms were closing, people were working out at home and my business was exploding. Starting in mid-March, my viewers increased exponentially. I started posting every day during lockdown and gained massive amounts of subscribers—almost 30,000 a day. In February, I grew by 100,000 subscribers. In April, I grew by a million. I hit three million subscribers by the end of that month.

I was excited to see so much growth. I’ve been building a huge library of home workouts for the past few years—over 200 videos—so it was amazing to see people using that content. These days, I film two or three days a week, then spend the rest of the time editing or creating workouts. I wake up at 8 a.m. and work until about 6 p.m. I rent the main floor of a house in Hamilton’s east end, and I film in my living room, which I’ve turned into my studio. Two months into the pandemic, I’ve slowed down my pace. I don’t want to burn myself out.

Many people have limited equipment at home, so I’ve started posting more bodyweight-only workouts or workouts using light weights that people can swap out for items like canned food, water bottles or shampoo bottles. I’ve also started posting more upbeat dance workouts, like a ’90s dance workout.

Kyle and I broke up six months ago, but he’s still a big part of the business. He handles admin work, answering emails and strategizing about the bigger-picture vision. I never would have thought that, at 24, I’d be able to live comfortably in my own apartment without having to stress about money. I could splurge and buy a brand new car or whatever, but I don’t. I like to save.